List of Accommodations

Page Index: Where are accommodations in an IEP?, Definitions, Scheduling, Setting, Equipment, Responding, Materials, Instruction (1), Test taking, Organization, Behavior, Groups and Peers, Physical Arrangements, Communication, Instruction (2), Testing, Homework, Memory Deficits, Processing Deficits and Changing Classes.

On the IEP  (2000 version):

page  IEP 2 - 'A: General Curriculum'

page  IEP 3 - 'B: Other educational needs',  listed under the heading:
    'What type(s) of accommodation is necessary for the student to make effective progress?"

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Accommodation
Defined as a support or service that is provided to help a student fully access the general education curriculum or subject matter. An accommodation does not change the content of what is being taught.

Modification is defined as a change to the general education curriculum or other material being taught. The teaching strategies are modified so the material is presented differently and/or the expectations of what the student will master are changed.

Here are some examples of modifications, taken from Margaret McLaughlin's book, Accessing the General Curriculum.

Modifications
1. The student is taught something different from the rest of the class
2. The student is taught the same information, but at a different level of complexity
3. The student has a reduced assignment (for example, has fewer questions to answer)
4. Use a lower level reading text book, which covers similar subject content
5. Expectations of what the student learns will vary based on modifications agreed to on the IEP (Individualized Education Program) 

From the Federation for Children with Special Needs, Spring 2002 Newsletter, p. 2 by Julie Sinclair Director of FCSN -Western region
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This page has two sets of examples of accommodations.  We like the way they have grouped/categorized them. 

What is an accommodation?  An accommodation is defined as a support or service that is provided to help a student fully access the general education curriculum or subject matter.  An accommodation does not change the content of what is being taught.  

Examples of different kinds of accommodations, take form DOE Resource Guide:

- Accommodations - Sample 1 -

 Scheduling

 Setting

 Equipment

 Responding

Materials

 In Instruction

  Test taking

 Organization

 Behavior

Groups and Peers

Adapted from the Federation for Children with Special Needs, Spring 2002 Newsletter, p. 2 by Julie Sinclair, Director of FCSN -Western region

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- Accommodations - Sample 2 -

Physical Arrangement of the Classroom

Communication

In Instruction

Testing

Homework

From Parent Journal, Spring 1996
Found on www.KidSource.com
http://www.kidsource.com/schwab/class.accom.schwab.html

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Memory Deficits

Is the problems with the storage and retrieval of information or memory?
Does it involve information still in the process of being learned (short-term memory) or
material that has been learned but not retained (long-term memory) or both short-term and long-term memory issues?

Accommodations for memory issues:

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Processing Deficits
Processing deficits interfere with the way students understand the information presented to them.  Expressive language, visual memory, etc.


Classroom Instructions:

Directions:
Note taking:
Homework, Quizzes and Tests:
Written assignments:
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The most common classroom accommodations for Processing and Memory Deficits


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A list of accommodations and interventions for students with ADD - by Becky Booth 14  (no longer posted on the www.ADD.org website.
  (we thank R.F. for finding this list).

School Accommodations and Modifications, from PACER Organization 14.

Please note: That PDF files 14 require a program called Adobe Acrobat Reader 31

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Accommodations for middle school & high school

Changing Classes 

(thanks to J.L. and T.K. of the IEP_Guide yahoo group, for sharing these 'Changing Classes'  accommodations)

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